Revolutionary Discovery Proves Einstein's Theory Of Gravitation

Scientists have now, 100 years after Albert Einstein's original prediction, detected ripples in the fabric of space. The ripples, called gravitational waves, were predicted by Einstein 100 years ago, but part of his theory was that the gravitational waves were too weak to distinguish. However, scientists who form part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, were able to observe the gravitational waves by using two large L-shaped detectors which extend for two and a half miles. 

These detectors held a laser beam which split at the bend in the L and then bounced off several mirrors which recombine the laser at a detector. If there was no gravitational wave, the laser beams would cancel each other out, meaning no light is found by the detector. When the gravitational wave went through the detector, one L-shaped detector stretched and the other shrunk, which made the laser beams misalign, creating a flash of light at the bend in the L and then bounce off several mirrors which recombined the laser at a detector. If there was no gravitational wave, the laser beams would cancel each other out, meaning no light is found by the detector. When the gravitational wave went through the detector, one L-shaped detector stretched and the other shrunk, which made the laser beams misalign, creating a flash of light. 

The discovery creates a brand new era of astronomy, in which gravitational waves can show scientists supernovas ages before they would be visible through a telescope, as well as helping astronomers study black holes. 

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